Jones wary of tough debut with Ware

Jones wary of tough debut with Ware

Weeks ago, when Aberdare’s Morgan Jones was preparing for his first professional contest by sparring Swansea’s unbeaten Chris Ware (4-0, 2KO) who would be ending two years of inactivity on the same show, neither had any idea they would be facing each other on fight night. The super-middleweights will fight tonight in a four round contest at the Rhydycar Leisure Centre in Merthyr Tydfil after the show’s promoters, Sanigar Events were unable to secure any other opponents for the pair. Jones, 23, is unsure how much the sparring will impact his fight with Ware but he’s certain that their styles will compliment each other’s aims. He said, “Do I read much in to it? Yeah and no. We sparred but at the end of the day, a fight is on a completely different level to that. “It’s going to be a great fight. To be honest, I didn’t expect it to come up but it’s here and I’m grabbing the chance with both hands, like. “The styles compare perfectly, we match each other. On the night, I’m going to be looking to keep it at long range to use my skills and Chris is going to be looking to close me down, sit down on his punches and hit me hard.” Ware will mark one of the toughest debuts on paper that a Welsh boxer has had in recent memory. The 32-year-old won the Welsh Senior Championships at middleweight (75KG) in 2011 and turned professional with four quick wins, two of which ended early. Severe hand injuries and a demanding work life, having created the hugely successful ‘Funky Pump’ gym craze, forced Ware to put boxing on hold for two years but he’s back and planning for progress at the expense of Jones. To overcome the challenges of the paid code, Jones has enlisted the services of Tony Borg, the Sport Wales Coach of the Year 2011. Now spending his days at St Joseph’s Boxing Club, arguably Wales’ most successful professional-amateur gym, Jones feels fully equipped for the tests without head-guards and vests. He said, “Tony’s taught me a lot about the tricks that experienced pros use. Tony has adapted well to my style and that’s the sign of a good coach, he knows what I’m good at. We’ve been practicing keeping light on our feet and stopping our opponent cutting me off and closing me down. “Because I’m about to be making m pro debut, it’s going to be interesting to see how my boxing does come along. What I definitely need to do is just box smart at range and that’s something I’ll definitely be doing. “It’s such a contrasting environment to my amateur gym [Merthyr Ex-Serviceman’s] where only a few of the boys were actually competing. Now in St Joe’s, there’s so many pros that there’s sparring going on every single time you’re in the gym. We don’t stop learning and it’s full of boys to look up to and learn from. That’s great for someone like me, just stepping in to the pro game.” Despite starting boxing relatively late compared to many of his peers, Jones reached international level by the end of his six year apprenticeship. The Welshman won his first fight at 17 and went on to experience 47 more contests, that included two wins at the Welsh Senior Championships at light-heavyweight (81KG). However, with mixed success at international level, Jones forced himself down a weight category to middleweight (75KG) with hopes of medalling at this past summer’s Commonwealth Games, only to be pipped by Dowlais’ Jamie Evans in the final of the Welsh Senior Championships and lose a space on the Welsh squad set for Glasgow. Reflecting on the situation, Jones said, “At middleweight, I was pretty much the right size for elite international competition because boys tend to be very big at the weight at the highest levels. At light-heavy on the Welsh circuit, the boys weren’t bigger than me but when I was boxing at international tournaments, the size difference was incredible. The international light-heavyweights were 6ft 4 [inches tall] and bangers, like. “I was caught in between weight divisions, I was a good light-heavy as an amateur but I didn’t have the size to get a Commonwealth Games gold medal. So, I tried to come down and boxed at middleweight, I needed to be at that weight at the top level but I was trying to make the weight in too small a space of time. Without the greatest of nutritional minds, it was a little bit rushed ad it didn’t help.” Tickets for Sanigar Events’ ‘Dragon Fire’ are priced at £30 for unreserved seating, £50 for ringside seating and £65 for VIP table seating. For tickets call the Sanigar Events Box Office on 0117 949 6699. Tickets will also be available on the doors which open at 6:00pm and the first bell will sound at 6.30pm. IMAGE BY CIARAN GIBBONS.

Multimag Comments

We love comments
No Comments Yet! You can be first to comment this post!

Your data will be safe! Your e-mail address will not be published. Also other data will not be shared with third person. Required fields marked as *