Tony Dixon – Road warrior to the home corner

Tony Dixon – Road warrior to the home corner

Boxing is never easy, especially when you’re starting out. If you’re young, talented and exciting then it’s often made a bit easier for you. Someone who ticks those boxes is Mountain Ash man Tony Dixon (5-0, 1KO) but the start to his paid punching career was far from straightforward. Dixon received no spoon-fed journeymen who turn up to pick up their pay packet and teach a novice pugilist a few tricks of the trade. Instead, the Welsh welterweight was on the road, far away from home and in the away corner where he appeared as the visiting fighter who promoters had picked to lose against their popular prospect… but that wasn’t the case. A 20-year-old Dixon had travelled over 700 miles to Doncaster, Essex and Sunderland to win his first three fights against opponents with a combined record of 13 wins and just three defeats. There are few boxers who manage to rip up the unwritten rule book but Dixon, who refused to accept the fate of a stereotypical game but outgunned loser, was having a good go at it. Reflecting, Dixon said, “If you want to win on the road, you’ve got to keep busy, really busy. You won’t win otherwise. You’ve got to throw a lot of punches, put a lot of work rate in to get it or the judging ain’t going your way.” It’s often the case that the careers of ‘away’ corner boxers who come to win are short, due to the physical demands of being in ‘real fights’. Thankfully, it now looks like Dixon will spend less time there and more time in the home corner where he will be allowed to learn the game properly without the pressure of going above and beyond to win. Dixon has signed with Bristol based manager and promoter Chris Sanigar, who has put the prospect in the home corner for consecutive contests, giving him valuable points wins over Jan Balog and William Warburton but Dixon hints that he’s still adapting to the change of status. He said, “I don’t know how it all changes for me really now. I went away, won my fights and I’ve got a change of manager now. So he’s putting me in the home corner and I don’t need to go on the road now. I’ll probably just go there when I need to now. “On the road, I was against prospect after prospect but in my fourth fight, I had a tough journeyman and I had to give up a stone as well. For my fifth fight, this guy (Dixon was speaking before he defeated Warburton on July 11th) has over 80 fights, I’ve only had a few so far. So, it’s still going to be hard for me, I know that like.” Dixon doesn’t have too much to say, he knows the situation and doesn’t overthink things, instead opting to stay ‘fight-by-fight’ focused but as he spoke after handing in his ticket money to the promoters, which will go on to fill his and his opponent’s purses, it was evident that he realised the reality of fighting at home too. He said, “It’s hard to compare being away or at home, they’re both hard. Boxing isn’t easy. You’ve just got to forget everything, let it all go and fight. It’ll always be stressful though, especially when you have to sell tickets and that to fight in Wales. “It’s lovely to box at home. It’s hard work going up and around the country all the time, even though you don’t have to sell tickets or nothing then. It’s hard going but no matter what, no fight is easy. You’ve got to do your best and see what happens.” Dixon, who is trained by Paul Paveldish at Mountain Ash Boxing Club, may be a polite and softly spoken introvert when quizzed on his career but in reality, he possesses qualities synonymous with his fitting nickname, ‘The Welsh Terrier’. Strong, sharp and smart – one way or another, Tony Dixon is determined to make his mark.

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